History of the other Citroën A-types

In addition to the 2CV and Mehari, Citroën produced a number of other derivatives. These were usually called A-types and were built totally on the basis of the chassis and/or engine of a Citroën 2CV.

Citroën AMI:

The Ami was built to create a bridge between the cheap 2CV and the expensive DS. This made it the ideal car for the “middle classes” of the 1960s.

First came the Ami 6, which was distinctive for its sloping rear window and the “hollow” bonnet flap. An estate version was released subsequently that in the end sold far more than the “sedan” and variants on it with the Ami Service and the Service Vitrée (two-door versions with or without side windows)

Then there were the Ami 8 and the Ami 8 Break estate, which offer more comfort than the Ami 6. There were mechanical changes, too. For instance, the Ami 8 had disc brakes, whereas the Ami 6 had drums.

Citroën also produced an Ami Super, with the 4-cylinder engine of the Citroën GS. However, this variant was not produced for long, which means that the original Ami Super has become a genuine rarity.

Citroën Acadiane:

This classic is the delivery van version of the Dyane. The chassis is a little longer than a 2CV or Dyane. The nose is just about the same as the Dyane, with a 602 cc engine under the bonnet.

Citroën AK:

The “2CV van” came out in different versions: the AZU, AK250, AK350 and AK400 and also Acadiane. These vans were all based on the Citroën 2CV and were used by companies such as the ANWB in the Netherlands.

Kit-cars:

Because the bodywork and chassis of the 2CV are so simple to dismantle and the engine lends itself to being converted, the Citroën 2CV makes the ideal base for a kit-car. There are various manufacturers of kit-cars, such as Burton, Le Patron and Lomax which are the best known. In Belgium, however, it is not easy to register these cars because the original was produced by Citroën. You are welcome to bring your kit-car to the 2CV Mehari Factory!